How to Draw Diplodocus

Cartoon diplodocus drawing image

Diplodocus - according to the experts - is the longest dinosaur ever to have walked the earth. They have specially designed teeth to strip the leaves off fern plants, and use their tails to communicate with other members of their herd (as learned from the show - 'Walking with Dinosaurs'!). :-)

Here, let's draw this giant dinosaur - cartoony - and as it would look, viewed from the side.

Here we go...


First Step - Draw a Diplodocus Framework

Once you position the head and body using a couple simple ovals, the rest of your dinosaur can be easily mapped out with a few more lines - including an extra long curved one, extending from the head oval, all the way past the body and out to the end of its tail.

Just like this...

Two circles for a diplodocus framework Connecting shapes to form a simple framework for a diplodocus

Just like liopleurodon in the previous lesson - again we've kept the framework nice and simple. As always though - feel free to add (or subtract!) shapes and details according to how much planning you wish to put into your drawing ahead of time.

Now let's draw this dinosaur!

Second Step - Draw Your Dinosaur!

Begin your drawing - starting with the head. A few simple curved lines help to bring this part into view in a very short amount of time. Then, with the head in place - draw a long curved line to bring the neck/back/spine/tail into view. Take your time with this part!

Alright - here's how it all pans out - right up until the very end...

Drawing the head of the diplodocus Drawing the mouth of the diplodocus Drawing the back of the diplodocus dinosaur Drawing the legs of the diplodocus dinosaur Drawing the underside of the diplodocus dinosaur Drawing the toes of the diplodocus dinosaur Mirroring the legs and feet of the diplodocus Black and white drawing of a cartoon diplodocus dinosaur

The most defining feature of this dinosaur is definitely the small spikes that line it's spine from head to tail. Still though, this dinosaur isn't always depicted with these spikes. And when it's not - it's a little bit more difficult to tell apart from other sauropods - Brachiosaurus, Apatosaurus, Ultrasaurus, etc.

Drawing-wise though - for sure... the spikes make for a really nice touch!

And there you have it - congrats on a job well done! :-)